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Mauro Borella

Looking at these images we all excite curiosity, we understand that these are areas of work and life we do not look at the clutter, dirt or other but as the place gives us the artist's life, not just work the artist, these places provide us a sense and it is this peculiarity of places to identify a sense, of who use them. In accord with our experience we can say that a property of the places is to be symbolic. What it means to be a symbolic place? It means that they guide imagination but are also models for living, today the aesthetics of the artist's house survives in the fashion of homes which use spaces abandoned by industrial activities.

 

These workplaces, atelier, are a way of life that has become a model to live and work for more than half a century in the city, extending from art to everyday life a type of home: the loft.

The artists and their studios mess up the middle-class house, Emile Zola in Oeuvre (1886) describes them thus:

"In front of the stove the ashes of the last winter still piled up. Besides the bed, a small table and a sofa, toilet, there was no other furniture than more than an old oak wardrobe smashed, and a great deal table cluttered with brushes, colors, dirty dishes, a alcohol lamp, on which had been a pot, smeared with vermicelli ... And, through the vast room the blanket of burning sun, which is falling through the windows and traveling without being tempered by the minimum tent, as a stream of liquid gold poured on all the ruins of furniture , which accentuated the careless misery  "

Began the myth of the artist's house

The origin of the loft is not in the conversion of industrial places abandoned, typical occupation of  the commercial lofts in New York in the '900, but in the artist's studios in the European cities of the nineteenth century when the bohemians began to live in buildings that were not building for habitation, breaking the rules and fueling popular imagination about  the romantic figure of the artist and his free life (Bohemian = gypsy); even today is usual in the common sense that an artist should be scruffy, distracted sometimes dirty.

Specially painters and sculptors needed places with light and large and high spaces for the characteristics of their work and if they could not build or rent existing atelier they set it in disused buildings such as stables, warehouses, factories, gyms etc.

As you can see these places from the real atelier interior look like spectacular and rich repertoire of various objects and tools for the art.

Represent one aspect of the atelier which is between two archetypes of the the counter-proposal the middle-class house, one that, as you can see from the real atelier interior images, shows the spectacular appearance and a rich repertoire of objects and tools for art exhibited as a story in the creative disorder, an other aspect  less known shows the creative concentration which relegates these objects in secondary rooms ".. the external objects disturb the inner world of images .." says Caspar David Friedrich, infact his study contained only an easel, a chair and a table.

Both break the average density and the furniture and decoration of the formal "bourgeois" order.

Why talk about place in the course of interior design?

The first obvious answer is that any object or project is faced with a user and a place where it should be placed and these two variables in the project can become themselves the project or at least a project opportunity.

The second answer is that in an increasingly globalized world the need for recognition and the relationship with the objects that populate the world and the world of living, in particular, is increasingly necessary, it is then a question of identity: the place as inspiration project can add identity and difference. 

 

 

 

Kraków
Akademia Sztuk Pięknych im. Jana Matejki
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Hogeschool Gent Koninklijke academie voor Schone Kunsten
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